Stigma-handling strategies in everyday life among women aged 20 to 30 with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency

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Stigma-handling strategies in everyday life among women aged 20 to 30 with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Stigma-handling strategies in everyday life among women aged 20 to 30 with transversal upper limb reduction deficiency
Author(s) Krantz, Oskar ; Bolin, Kristian ; Persson, Dennis
Date 2008
English abstract
This grounded theory study shows an adaptation of stigma-handling strategies to situations in everyday life by women aged 20 to 30 with dysmelia, i.e. transversal upper limb reduction deficiency (TULRD). Strategies are comprehensive patterns of action aimed at controlling information about one’s status as deviating from an ad hoc normality. Strategies consist of: (1) Attitude (proofing/being); (2) Tactic (concealing/revealing); (3) Exposure (volun-tary/imposed); and (4) Boost (amplifying/altering). A proofing or being attitude constitutes a contextual adaptation understood in terms of a concealing or revealing tactic, aiming at delay-ing or promoting exposure to contextual attitudes and possible prejudices. If exposure is de-layed, a person with dysmelia blends in. Exposure may be voluntary or imposed. After expo-sure, the relative importance of TULRD in the specific context may decrease, thus a boost of an amplification or altering of the attitude, i.e. boost is the interactional outcome enforcing the choice of strategy in another context.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15017410801900374 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Host/Issue Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research;4
Volume 10
ISSN 1501-7419 (Print), 1745-3011 (Online)
Pages 209-226
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) body-image
congenital limb deficiency
dysmelia
gender
transversal upper limb reduction deficiency
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/13875 (link to this page)

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