Women oppressed in the name of culture and religion, Saudi Arabia and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

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Women oppressed in the name of culture and religion, Saudi Arabia and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

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Publication Bachelor thesis
Title Women oppressed in the name of culture and religion, Saudi Arabia and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women
Author(s) Andersson, Elin ; Togelius, Linn
Date 2011
English abstract
In Saudi Arabia women are legal minors who need permission from a male guardian in, among others, matters concerning education, employment and health care. Despite the obvious subordination of women in the country, Saudi Arabia has ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, with a reservation saying that in cases of contradiction between the Convention and Islamic law they do not obligate themselves to follow the rules of the Convention. Respecting the culture, tradition and religion of non-western societies is important in the work with implementing international human rights. However, in the case of Saudi Arabia, it seems like the cultural and religious claims merely function as justification of an institutional oppression of women. This institutional practice of oppression is unique and taken to the extreme, but oppression of women in itself is a global phenomenon, which is not connected to a specific culture.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Kultur och samhälle
Pages 36
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Saudi Arabia
CEDAW
women's rights
Feminism
Cultural relativism
Islamic law
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/11782 (link to this page)

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