Using Personal Digital Assistants to Improve Healthcare Delivery in Uganda

DSpace Repository

Using Personal Digital Assistants to Improve Healthcare Delivery in Uganda

Show full item record

Files for download

Facebook

Simple item record

Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title Using Personal Digital Assistants to Improve Healthcare Delivery in Uganda
Author(s) Kirunda, Kakaire Ayub
Date 2010
English abstract
Effective Health Systems make service provision easy for health workers, especially if they have access to the latest guidelines in a dynamic profession where new technologies are ever emerging. However, available data indicates that the health system in Uganda is constrained and still using old technologies despite the availability of newer technologies. As a result, this study sought to investigate the adoptability, cost effectiveness, and sustainability with regard to Personal Digital Assistants. The study, which was cross sectional in nature, was carried out in Mbale District in Eastern Uganda between 2008 and 2010. In depth interviews were conducted with health workers and key informants. Also, published and unpublished literature about the Uganda Health Information Network was reviewed. The findings revealed that the use of Personal Digital Assistants also known as handheld computers can go a long way towards improving healthcare delivery in countryside health facilities. To health workers in remote places, the PDAs are a source of the latest clinical care guidelines for several diseases including HIV and AIDS as well as malaria. Health information systems have been improved and data collection and reporting have been eased by this technology. However, while evidence of viability of this technology exists, it still has challenges like power and delays in software updates among others.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Kultur och samhälle
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Personal Digital Assistants
Adoptability
Sustainability
Uganda Health Information Network
Medical Digital Divide
ICTs In Health Care
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/11830 (link to this page)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics