Adsorption of low-density lipoprotein, its oxidation, and subsequent binding of specific recombinant antibodies: an in situ ellipsometric study

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Adsorption of low-density lipoprotein, its oxidation, and subsequent binding of specific recombinant antibodies: an in situ ellipsometric study

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Adsorption of low-density lipoprotein, its oxidation, and subsequent binding of specific recombinant antibodies: an in situ ellipsometric study
Author(s) Stollenwerk, Maria M. ; Svensson, Olof ; Schiopu, Alexandru ; Jansson, Bo ; Arnebrant, Thomas ; Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
Date 2011
English abstract
BACKGROUND: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles accumulate in the arterial wall and become oxidized during atherogenesis, leading to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. The major protein of the LDL particle, apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), becomes fragmented during oxidation and a target for the immune system. METHODS: In this study we used in situ ellipsometry to monitor the adsorption of LDL to solid silica surfaces and the effects of oxidation on the structure of the adsorbed LDL layer. We additionally investigated the binding kinetics of two recombinant human antibodies with different specificities recognizing epitopes of apoB-100 in surface-bound native and CuCl₂-oxidized LDL (oxLDL). The latter process was studied by adsorbing LDL and then adding the antibody and CuCl₂ while continuously monitoring adsorbed amount and the thickness of the film. The molar ratios between the antibodies and surface-bound LDL and oxLDL were calculated from these data. RESULTS: Our results indicate that oxidation of surface-bound LDL induces swelling of the layer, accompanied by a slight desorption. We further found that both antibodies were able to recognize LDL and oxLDL in its adsorbed orientation. Quantitative information was obtained on the number of available binding sites on surface-bound LDL and oxLDL for these two antibodies. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: Using ellipsometry for real-time monitoring of adsorption, in situ oxidation of LDL and binding of specific recombinant antibodies to surface-bound LDL, will open up possibilities to map different conformations and orientations of LDL in the adsorbed state.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbagen.2010.10.006 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Elsevier
Host/Issue Biochimica et Biophysica Acta;2
Volume 1810
ISSN 0304-4165
Pages 211-217
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Adsorption
Antibody
apoB-100
Ellipsometry
Oxidation
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)
Sciences
Research Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/13053 (link to this page)

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