Attained education and self-assessed health later in life when diagnosed with diabetes in childhood: a population-based study

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Attained education and self-assessed health later in life when diagnosed with diabetes in childhood: a population-based study

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Attained education and self-assessed health later in life when diagnosed with diabetes in childhood: a population-based study
Author(s) Wennick, Anne ; Hallström, Inger ; Lindgren, Björn ; Bolin, Kristian
Date 2011
English abstract
Background: Previous studies have reported conflicting findings on academic achievement in children with type 1 diabetes, and generally lower self-assessed health status among respondents with diabetes. Objective: Thus, in this study, using the theoretical framework of the human-capital model, a population-based survey data set for Sweden, and explanatory variables following predictions from theory and previous empirical human-capital studies, individuals diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 19 were examined whether they differ from the general population at the same age concerning (i) educational level attained and (ii) self-assessed health later in life. Special attention was devoted to the association between education and health. Subjects: A set of pooled cross-sectional population survey data complemented with register data, comprising 20 670 individuals (of whom 106 individuals were diagnosed with diabetes), aged 19–38 yr, from 1988 to 2000, was created from the Swedish Biennial Survey of Living Conditions. Method: The influence of childhood diabetes was analyzed using multiple regression analysis, controlling for educational level, wage, sex, age, marital status, and parental ethnicity. Results: Childhood diabetes was associated with lower levels of attained education and self-assessed health in comparison with the general population. More educated individuals reported better health, though. Conclusions: In terms of the rapid increase in the incidence of diabetes in many countries, it is important to bear in mind that investments made both in education and in health, early in life, may facilitate the capability of the individual to experience healthy time later in life.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-5448.2011.00757.x (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Host/Issue Pediatr Diabetes;7
Volume 12
ISSN 1399-543X
Pages 619-26
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) adult children
diabetes mellitus
economics
educational status
health
Medicine
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/13966 (link to this page)

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