INTENSIVE VERTICAL URBAN AGRICULTURE: Rethinking our Cities’ Food Supply. Moving Towards Sustainable Urban Development.

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INTENSIVE VERTICAL URBAN AGRICULTURE: Rethinking our Cities’ Food Supply. Moving Towards Sustainable Urban Development.

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Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title INTENSIVE VERTICAL URBAN AGRICULTURE: Rethinking our Cities’ Food Supply. Moving Towards Sustainable Urban Development.
Author(s) VUATTOUX, Romain
Date 2013
English abstract
Our modern “traditional” agricultural system is not sustainable. This system is highly dependent on limited resources such as land, oil and water. It also has numerous negative impacts, including the depletion of resources leading to higher prices, pollutions leading to health risks, global warming, deforestation and biodiversity loss. These dependencies and consequences are combined with a growing and ever more affluent global population which requires greater amount of resources to support its growth and which increases the negative impacts on the environment. All indicates that our system is reaching its limits and that there is a need for new solutions. This research introduces the general context (problem and existing research) and explores an alternative, namely: Intensive Vertical Urban Agriculture (I.V.U.A.). This method seems to offer two particularly interesting promises beneficial for Sustainable Urban Development: the reduction of transportation, and the integration of food production in the urban nutrient and energy cycles. However, to achieve these potential benefits the technology (in a broad sense) has to meet several challenges and there is a need for further experimentation. This study explores challenges of I.V.U.A. and key factors enabling or hindering experimentation in this field. This investigation identified key barriers to further development of I.V.U.A. through the use of a case study. The Plantagon International ABis a unique project which will be built in 2013, in Linkoping, Sweden. It will be the first vertical greenhouse of a considerable scale in the world with a research and commercial aim. Barriers to I.V.U.A. were identified as: - Lack of awareness about the problems with our modern food supply, and hence missed opportunities for S.U.D. - Attitudes that are working against I.V.U.A. and competition for recognition with other forms of agriculture as alternative to the problem of food production - Lack of technical abilities, knowledge and skills in I.V.U.A. - Funding/supporting infrastructures (physical or informational) - Blockages that are the result of administrations and policies which are largely based around “traditional” agriculture. Finally, a set of recommendations was drawn from the interviews of the case study and the literature review, to help planners and decision-makers lift these barriers and enable experimenting. These four implications to consider and explore are: - Gaining understanding of the complexity of S.U.D.problems and the need for a wide range of solutions which include I.V.U.A.; - Including a greater amount of stakeholders, and considering contexts - Improving access to land but also to resources and infrastructures - Building support to enable I.V.U.A. to thrive on its own
Publisher Malmö högskola/Kultur och samhälle
Pages 48
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Sustainable food supply
participatory planning
Policies for innovation
Barriers to innovation
Peak oil/resources
Import substitution
Intensive vertical urban agriculture
Closed-loop systems
Urban agriculture
Food production systems
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/15202 (link to this page)

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