'Even if it is not your fault, it is your responsibility': Livestreaming as means of civic engagement. A case study of citizen journalism in Egypt and Syria

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'Even if it is not your fault, it is your responsibility': Livestreaming as means of civic engagement. A case study of citizen journalism in Egypt and Syria

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Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title 'Even if it is not your fault, it is your responsibility': Livestreaming as means of civic engagement. A case study of citizen journalism in Egypt and Syria
Author(s) Bengtsson, Rebecca
Date 2013
English abstract
A well-functioning media is a given part of any society, and can be a valuable tool in the democratising process of a country. The media is traditionally given the role of providing citizens with information about political events in society, and as a result enabling them to make informed decisions. Before the 1990s most of the Middle Eastern and North African media was controlled by governments and because of that they often failed in their responsibility as information providers. As new media such as the internet and satellite television were introduced to the region, the media paradigm shifted and a new arena for public debate arose and has continued to grow ever since. During the 2010-2011 uprisings in the region social media platforms were used by citizens to spread news about demonstrations and political moves, not only within countries, but also globally. Livestreaming applications in particular were used successfully, and videos filmed by citizen journalists were broadcast on international media channels This thesis focuses on the use of livestreaming by citizen journalists in Egypt and Syria to accomplish a social change, and on citizen journalism as an act of civic engagement. To provide an analytic frame, this thesis uses the work of Dahlgren (2009) and his six modes of civic engagement, to better and understand the role of citizen journalists in changing society. Through a number of qualitative interviews with citizen journalists, traditional journalists and Bambuser, this thesis concludes that citizen journalism did play and still plays an important role when it comes to civic engagement in Egypt and Syria although weather or not it might be able to take the role of traditional media in society remains to be seen. The interviews with citizen journalists were conducted in Cairo, Egypt and funded through a Minor Field Study grant.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Kultur och samhälle
Pages 72
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Egypt, livestreaming, media convergence, public sphere, social change, Syria
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/15221 (link to this page)

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