Implant Stability and Bone Remodeling after 3 and 13 Days of Implantation with an Initial Static Strain

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Implant Stability and Bone Remodeling after 3 and 13 Days of Implantation with an Initial Static Strain

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Implant Stability and Bone Remodeling after 3 and 13 Days of Implantation with an Initial Static Strain
Author(s) Halldin, Anders ; Jimbo, Ryo ; Johansson, Carina B. ; Wennerberg, Ann ; Jacobsson, Magnus ; Albrektsson, Tomas ; Hansson, Stig
Date 2014
English abstract
Objective Bone is constantly exposed to dynamic and static loads, which induce both dynamic and static bone strains. Although numerous studies exist on the effect of dynamic strain on implant stability and bone remodeling, the effect of static strain needs further investigation. Therefore, the effect of two different static bone strain levels on implant stability and bone remodeling at two different implantation times was investigated in a rabbit model. Methods Two different test implants with a diametrical expansion of 0.15 mm (group A) and 0.05 mm (group B) creating initial static bone strains of 0.045 and 0.015, respectively. The implants were inserted in the proximal tibial metaphysis of 24 rabbits to observe the biological response at implant removal. Both groups were compared to control implants (group C), with no diametrical increase. The insertion torque (ITQ) was measured to represent the initial stability and the removal torque (RTQ) was measured to analyze the effect that static strain had on implant stability and bone remodeling after 3 and 13 days of implantation time. Results The ITQ and the RTQ values for test implants were significantly higher for both implantation times compared to control implants. A selection of histology samples was prepared to measure bone to implant contact (BIC). There was a tendency that the BIC values for test implants were higher compared to control implants. Conclusion These findings suggest that increased static bone strain creates higher implant stability at the time of insertion, and this increased stability is maintained throughout the observed period.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cid.12000 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Wiley
Host/Issue Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research;3
Volume 16
ISSN 1708-8208
Pages 383–393
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) animal model
bone resorption
implant stability
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/15609 (link to this page)

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