Decreased Bacterial Adherence and Biofilm Growth on Surfaces Coated with a Solution of Benzalkonium Chloride

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Decreased Bacterial Adherence and Biofilm Growth on Surfaces Coated with a Solution of Benzalkonium Chloride

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Decreased Bacterial Adherence and Biofilm Growth on Surfaces Coated with a Solution of Benzalkonium Chloride
Author(s) Jaramillo, David E. ; Arriola, Alberto ; Safavi, Kamran ; Chávez de Paz, Luis Eduardo
Date 2012
English abstract
Introduction Secondary biofilm formation by oral bacteria after breakdown/fracture of temporary or permanent restorations imposes a challenge to the outcome of root canal treatment. This study focuses on benzalkonium chloride (BAK) coating on dentin or polystyrene surfaces and its influence on the early adhesion and biofilm formation by oral and root canal bacteria. Methods Microbial adhesion and biofilm growth on surfaces coated with BAK were analyzed qualitatively with a dentin disk model and quantitatively with a mini-flow cell biofilm model. Cell viability and total biovolume were analyzed by the LIVE/DEAD technique. The repelling effect of surfaces coated with BAK was compared with NaOCl. Uncoated surfaces were used as controls. Results Scanning electron microscope images in the dentin disk model revealed that very sparse biofilms were formed on NaOCl- and BAK-coated dentin surfaces. In contrast, biofilms formed on uncoated dentin were clearly visible as numerous irregularly distributed aggregates of rods and cocci. In the mini-flow cell system, confocal laser scanning microscope analysis confirmed that biofilms formed on NaOCl- and BAK-coated surfaces showed significantly less adhesion (2 hours) and biovolume accumulation (24 and 96 hours) compared with the uncoated controls (P < .01). Furthermore, cell viability assessments showed that on uncoated controls the viability measurements were high (>89%) as well as on BAK-coated surfaces (88% viable cells). However, cell viability was significantly reduced on NaOCl-coated surfaces (59% viable cells). Conclusions This study illustrates that surface coating with a surfactant solution containing BAK does not cause cell membrane damage but might interfere with cell mechanisms of adhesion. Investigations into the clinical utility of BAK as an antibiofilm medication are warranted.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2012.03.012 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Elsevier
Host/Issue Journal of Endodontics;6
Volume 38
ISSN 0099-2399
Pages 821–825
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Benzalkonium chloride
biofilm
CLSM analysis
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/15790 (link to this page)

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