A multi-centre cohort study shows no association between experienced violence and labour dystocia in nulliparous women at term

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A multi-centre cohort study shows no association between experienced violence and labour dystocia in nulliparous women at term

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title A multi-centre cohort study shows no association between experienced violence and labour dystocia in nulliparous women at term
Author(s) Finnbogadóttir, Hafrún ; Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth ; Dykes, Anna-Karin
Date 2011
English abstract
Background: Although both labour dystocia and domestic violence during pregnancy are associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcome, evidence in support of a possible association between experiences of domestic violence and labour dystocia is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate whether self-reported history of violence or experienced violence during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of labour dystocia in nulliparous women at term. Methods: A population-based multi-centre cohort study. A self-administrated questionnaire collected at 37 weeks of gestation from nine obstetric departments in Denmark. The total cohort comprised 2652 nulliparous women, among whom 985 (37.1%) met the protocol criteria for dystocia. Results: Among the total cohort, 940 (35.4%) women reported experience of violence, and among these, 66 (2.5%) women reported exposure to violence during their first pregnancy. Further, 39.5% (n = 26) of those had never been exposed to violence before. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed no association between history of violence or experienced violence during pregnancy and labour dystocia at term, crude OR 0.91, 95% CI (0.77-1.08), OR 0.90, 95% CI (0.54-1.50), respectively. However, violence exposed women consuming alcoholic beverages during late pregnancy had increased odds of labour dystocia, crude OR 1.45, 95% CI (1.07-1.96). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that nulliparous women who have a history of violence or experienced violence during pregnancy do not appear to have a higher risk of labour dystocia at term, according to the definition of labour dystocia in this study. Additional research on this topic would be beneficial, including further evaluation of the criteria for labour dystocia. Background Accumulating knowledge suggests that domestic violence occurring during pregnancy is a serious public health issue due to the risk for adverse maternal and fetal health outcomes [1-3]. Labour dystocia, another serious complication in obstetrics, has also been increasingly highlighted during the past decades [4-9]. Labour dystocia is defined as a slow or difficult labour or childbirth. According to Kjaergaard et al. [10] the term ‘dystocia’ is frequently used in clinical practice, yet there is no consistency in the use of terminology for prolonged labour or labour.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2393-11-14 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher BioMed Central
Host/Issue BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth;14
Volume 11
ISSN 1471-2393
Pages 9
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Labour dystocia
Violence
nulliparous women
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/15894 (link to this page)

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