Somatosensory sensitivity in patients with persistent idiopathic orofacial pain is associated with pain relief from hypnosis and relaxation

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Somatosensory sensitivity in patients with persistent idiopathic orofacial pain is associated with pain relief from hypnosis and relaxation

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Somatosensory sensitivity in patients with persistent idiopathic orofacial pain is associated with pain relief from hypnosis and relaxation
Author(s) Baad-Hansen, Lene ; Abrahamsen, Randi ; Zachariaert, Robe ; List, Thomas ; Svensson, Peter
Date 2013
English abstract
OBJECTIVES: In a recent study hypnosis has been found to relieve persistent idiopathic orofacial pain. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is widely used to evaluate somatosensory sensitivity, which has been suggested as a possible predictor of management outcome. The objectives of this study were to examine: (1) possible associations between clinical pain relief and baseline somatosensory sensitivity and (2) the effect of hypnosis management on QST parameters. METHODS: Forty-one patients with persistent idiopathic orofacial pain completed this randomized controlled study in 1 of 2 groups: hypnosis (hypnotic analgesia suggestions) or control (relaxation). QST at 2 intraoral (pain region and contralateral mirror image region) and 3 extraoral (hand and both cheeks) sites was performed at baseline and after the hypnosis/control management, together with pressure pain thresholds and pressure pain tolerance thresholds determined bilaterally at the masseter and temporalis muscles, the temporomandibular joints, and the third finger. RESULTS: Degree of pain relief was negatively correlated with a summary statistic of baseline somatosensory sensitivity (summed z-score), that is, high baseline somatosensory sensitivity was associated with low pain relief (r=-0.372, P=0.020). Hypnosis had no major effect on any QST measure compared with relaxation (P>0.063). CONCLUSIONS: High pain sensitivity at baseline may predict poor pain management outcome. In addition, despite clear clinical pain relief, hypnosis did not significantly or specifically influence somatosensory sensitivity. Future studies should further explore QST measures as possible predictors of different management response in orofacial pain conditions.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e318268e4e7 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Host/Issue Clinical journal of pain;6
Volume 29
ISSN 0749-8047
Pages 518-26
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/15904 (link to this page)

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