Long-term follow-up of a high- and a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention in a dental setting : a randomized trial

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Long-term follow-up of a high- and a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention in a dental setting : a randomized trial

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Long-term follow-up of a high- and a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention in a dental setting : a randomized trial
Author(s) Nohlert, Eva ; Öhrvik, John ; Tegelberg, Åke ; Tillgren, Per ; Helgason, Ásgeir R
Date 2013
English abstract
BACKGROUND: Achieving lifelong tobacco abstinence is an important public health goal. Most studies use 1-year follow-ups, but little is known about how good these are as proxies for long-term and life-long abstinence. Also, intervention intensity is an important issue for development of efficient and cost-effective cessation treatment protocols.The study aims were to assess the long-term effectiveness of a high- and a low-intensity treatment (HIT and LIT) for smoking cessation and to analyze to what extent 12-month abstinence predicted long-term abstinence. METHODS: 300 smokers attending dental or general health care were randomly assigned to HIT or LIT at the public dental clinic. Main outcome measures were self-reported point prevalence, continuous abstinence (>=6 months), and sustained abstinence. The study was a follow-up after 5--8 years of a previously performed 12-month follow-up, both by postal questionnaires. RESULTS: Response rate was 85% (n=241) of those still alive and living in Sweden. Abstinence rates were 8% higher in both programs at the long-term than at the 12-month follow-up. The difference of 7% between HIT and LIT had not change, being 31% vs. 24% for point prevalence and 26% vs. 19% for 6-month continuous abstinence, respectively. Significantly more participants in HIT (12%) than in LIT (5%) had been sustained abstinent (p=0.03). Logistic regression analyses showed that abstinence at 12-month follow-up was a strong predictor for abstinence at long-term follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Abstinence at 12-month follow-up is a good predictor for long-term abstinence. The difference in outcome between HIT and LIT for smoking cessation remains at least 5--8 years after the intervention.Trial registration number: NCT00670514.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-592 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher BioMed Central
Host/Issue BMC public health;
Volume 13
ISSN 1471-2458
Pages 592
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Tobacco cessation
Treatment intensity
Public health
Health care
Questionnaire
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/16059 (link to this page)

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