Climate change and everyday life : repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue

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Climate change and everyday life : repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Climate change and everyday life : repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue
Author(s) Byrne, Jenny ; Ideland, Malin ; Malmberg, Claes ; Grace, Marcus
Date 2014
English abstract
There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9–10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue (SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these were sometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives. Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students’ engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09500693.2014.891159 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Host/Issue International Journal of Science Education;9
Volume 36
ISSN 0950-0693
Pages 1491-1509
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Primary school
Global warming
Discursive repertoires
Discourse analysis
science education
Environmental education
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/17512 (link to this page)

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