Collective efficacy, neighborhood and geographical units of analysis : findings from a case study of Swedish residential neighborhoods

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Collective efficacy, neighborhood and geographical units of analysis : findings from a case study of Swedish residential neighborhoods

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Collective efficacy, neighborhood and geographical units of analysis : findings from a case study of Swedish residential neighborhoods
Author(s) Gerell, Manne
Date 2015
English abstract
The concept of collective efficacy, defined as the combination of mutual trust and willingness to act for the common good, has received widespread attention in the field of criminology. Collective efficacy is linked to, among other outcomes, violent crime, disorder, and fear of crime. The concept has been applied to geographical units ranging from below one hundred up to several thousand residents on average. In this paper key informant- and focus group interview transcripts from four Swedish neighborhoods are examined to explore whether different sizes of geographical units of analysis are equally important for collective efficacy. The four studied neighborhoods are divided into micro-neighborhoods (N=12) and micro-places (N=59) for analysis. The results show that neighborhoods appear to be too large to capture the social mechanism of collective efficacy which rather takes place at smaller units of geography. The findings are compared to survey responses on collective efficacy (N=597) which yield an indication in the same direction through comparison of ICC-values and AIC model fit employing unconditional two-level models in HLM 6.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10610-014-9257-3 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Springer
Host/Issue European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research;3
Volume 21
ISSN 0928-1371
Pages 385-406
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Collective efficacy
neighborhood
Micro-neighborhood
Micro-place
geography
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/18061 (link to this page)

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