Adherence of human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to nano-structured titanium surfaces

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Adherence of human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to nano-structured titanium surfaces

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Adherence of human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to nano-structured titanium surfaces
Author(s) Dorkhan, Marjan ; Yucel-Lindberg, Tulay ; Hall, Jan ; Svensäter, Gunnel ; Davies, Julia R
Date 2014
English abstract
BACKGROUND: A key element for long-term success of dental implants is integration of the implant surface with the surrounding host tissues. Modification of titanium implant surfaces can enhance osteoblast activity but their effects on soft-tissue cells are unclear. Adherence of human keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to control commercially pure titanium (CpTi) and two surfaces prepared by anodic oxidation was therefore investigated. Since implant abutments are exposed to a bacteria-rich environment in vivo, the effect of oral bacteria on keratinocyte adhesion was also evaluated. METHODS: The surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of adhered cells and binding strength, as well as vitality of fibroblasts and keratinocytes were evaluated using confocal scanning laser microscopy after staining with Live/Dead Baclight. To evaluate the effect of bacteria on adherence and vitality, keratinocytes were co-cultured with a four-species streptococcal consortium. RESULTS: SEM analysis showed the two anodically oxidized surfaces to be nano-structured with differing degrees of pore-density. Over 24 hours, both fibroblasts and keratinocytes adhered well to the nano-structured surfaces, although to a somewhat lesser degree than to CpTi (range 42-89% of the levels on CpTi). The strength of keratinocyte adhesion was greater than that of the fibroblasts but no differences in adhesion strength could be observed between the two nano-structured surfaces and the CpTi. The consortium of commensal streptococci markedly reduced keratinocyte adherence on all the surfaces as well as compromising membrane integrity of the adhered cells. CONCLUSION: Both the vitality and level of adherence of soft-tissue cells to the nano-structured surfaces was similar to that on CpTi. Co-culture with streptococci reduced the number of keratinocytes on all the surfaces to approximately the same level and caused cell damage, suggesting that commensal bacteria could affect adherence of soft-tissue cells to abutment surfaces in vivo.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6831-14-75 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher BioMed Central
Host/Issue BMC Oral Health;75
Volume 14
ISSN 1472-6831
Pages 1-9
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) dental implant
soft-tissue
anodic oxidation
cell binding
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/18150 (link to this page)

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