Mobile phone brief intervention applications for risky alcohol use among university students : a randomized controlled study

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Mobile phone brief intervention applications for risky alcohol use among university students : a randomized controlled study

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Mobile phone brief intervention applications for risky alcohol use among university students : a randomized controlled study
Author(s) Gajecki, Mikael ; Berman, Anne H ; Sinadinovic, Kristina ; Rosendahl, Ingvar ; Andersson, Claes
Date 2014
English abstract
BACKGROUND: Brief interventions via the internet have been shown to reduce university students' alcohol intake. This study tested two smartphone applications (apps) targeting drinking choices on party occasions, with the goal of reducing problematic alcohol intake among Swedish university students. METHODS: Students were recruited via e-mails sent to student union members at two universities. Those who gave informed consent, had a smartphone, and showed risky alcohol consumption according to the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) were randomized into three groups. Group 1 had access to the Swedish government alcohol monopoly's app, Promillekoll, offering real-time estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC) calculation; Group 2 had access to a web-based app, PartyPlanner, developed by the research group, offering real-time eBAC calculation with planning and follow-up functions; and Group 3 participants were controls. Follow-up was conducted at 7 weeks. RESULTS: Among 28574 students offered participation, 4823 agreed to join; 415 were excluded due to incomplete data, and 1932 fulfilled eligibility criteria for randomization. Attrition was 22.7-39.3 percent, higher among heavier drinkers and highest in Group 2. Self-reported app use was higher in Group 1 (74%) compared to Group 2 (41%). Per-protocol analyses revealed only one significant time-by-group interaction, where Group 1 participants increased the frequency of their drinking occasions compared to controls (p = 0.001). Secondary analyses by gender showed a significant difference among men in Group 1 for frequency of drinking occasions per week (p = 0.001), but not among women. Among all participants, 29 percent showed high-risk drinking, over the recommended weekly drinking levels of 9 (women) and 14 (men) standard glasses. CONCLUSIONS: Smartphone apps can make brief interventions available to large numbers of university students. The apps studied using eBAC calculation did not, however, seem to affect alcohol consumption among university students and one app may have led to a negative effect among men. Future research should: 1) explore ways to increase user retention, 2) include apps facilitating technical manipulation for evaluation of added components, 3) explore the effects of adapting app content to possible gender differences, and 4) offer additional interventions to high-risk users. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01958398.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1940-0640-9-11 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher BioMed Central
Host/Issue Addiction science & clinical practice;11
Volume 9
ISSN 1940-0632
Pages 12
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/18162 (link to this page)

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