Changes in Alcohol Expectancies, Drinking and Alcohol-Related Negative Consequences in the Transition out of High School

DSpace Repository

Changes in Alcohol Expectancies, Drinking and Alcohol-Related Negative Consequences in the Transition out of High School

Show full item record

Files for download

Find Full text There are no files associated with this item.

Facebook

Simple item record

Publication Other
Title Changes in Alcohol Expectancies, Drinking and Alcohol-Related Negative Consequences in the Transition out of High School
Author(s) Fossos-Wong, Nicole ; Dillworth, Tiara ; Grazioli, Veronique S ; Lee, Christine A ; Kilmer, Jason ; Pace, Tim ; Andersson, Claes ; Johnsson, Kent O ; Berglund, Mats ; Larimer, Mary E
Date 2014
English abstract
The transition fromadolescence to emerging adulthood is a period of increased risk for heavy drinking behavior. Prior research has found that college students drink more and experience more consequences than their non-college counterparts. However, sparse research has examined whether students who are college- versus work-bound show differences in drinking and related consequences in high school (HS) as well. In addition, little research has explored whether alcohol expectancies also change over time as a function of selection into college versus non-college environments. The current study examined whether alcohol-related expectancies, consequences, and drinking changed over the course of a year as a function of whether participants transitioned into a four-year university (UNI), community college/trade school (CC), or workforce setting (WF). Participants (N=848) were HS seniors (mean age=17.5 years; 37%male, 73%Caucasian) taking part in a larger study examining alcohol use trajectories.Measures included alcohol expectancies (CEOA), drinking (DDQ), and alcohol-related problems (RAPI) assessed during their senior year and one year later. Repeatedmeasures ANOVAs revealed significant main effects for time, indicating increases in drinks per week F(1, 807)=19.18, p>0.001 and alcohol-related problems F(1, 808)=8.78, p>0.01 and a decrease in alcohol expectancies F(1, 808)=14.35, p>0.001 from baseline to 12 month follow-up. Results also found a main effect for group, indicating UNI students held higher expectancies F(2, 808)=8.15, p>0.001 and drank more F(2, 807)=6.26, p>0.01 than other participants. A significant time9group interaction showed that whereas UNI-bound students drank less thanWF-bound students in HS, the roles reversed one year later with UNI students drinking more thanWF students F (2, 807)=27.56, p>0.001. Similarly, WF-bound students had more alcohol-related problems in HS followed by CC-bound students and UNI-bound students, but one year later the order reversed with UNI students exhibiting the most alcohol-related problems F(2, 807)=5.21, p>0.01. Results indicate that whereas UNI-bound seniors exhibit the highest expectancies, drink less, and experience fewer problems during HS, upon entry into UNI, they experience more problems and out-drink their CC andWF counterparts. These results highlight the importance of prevention strategies, including an expectancy challenge component, especially for UNI-bound HS seniors.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acer.12451 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Wiley
Host/Issue Special Issue: Abstracts from the 37th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, June 21-25, Bellevue, Washington;
Volume 38
Series/Issue Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research;s 1
ISSN 1530-0277
Pages 59A
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Note 37th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, June 21-25, Bellevue, Washington
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/18308 (link to this page)
Link http://www.rsoa.org/2014meet-indexAbs.htm (external link to related web page)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics