Pre-clinical in vivo models for the screening of bone biomaterials for oral/craniofacial indications: focus on small-animal models

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Pre-clinical in vivo models for the screening of bone biomaterials for oral/craniofacial indications: focus on small-animal models

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Pre-clinical in vivo models for the screening of bone biomaterials for oral/craniofacial indications: focus on small-animal models
Author(s) Stavropoulos, Andreas ; Sculean, Anton ; Bosshardt, Dieter D ; Buser, Daniel ; Klinge, Björn
Date 2015
English abstract
Preclinical in vivo experimental studies are performed for evaluating proof-of-principle concepts, safety and possible unwanted reactions of candidate bone biomaterials before proceeding to clinical testing. Specifically, models involving small animals have been developed for screening bone biomaterials for their potential to enhance bone formation. No single model can completely recreate the anatomic, physiologic, biomechanic and functional environment of the human mouth and jaws. Relevant aspects regarding physiology, anatomy, dimensions and handling are discussed in this paper to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of small-animal models. Model selection should be based not on the 'expertise' or capacities of the team, but rather on a scientifically solid rationale, and the animal model selected should reflect the question for which an answer is sought. The rationale for using heterotopic or orthotopic testing sites, and intraosseous, periosseous or extraskeletal defect models, is discussed. The paper also discusses the relevance of critical size defect modeling, with focus on calvarial defects in rodents. In addition, the rabbit sinus model and the capsule model in the rat mandible are presented and discussed in detail. All animal experiments should be designed with care and include sample-size and study-power calculations, thus allowing generation of meaningful data. Moreover, animal experiments are subject to ethical approval by the relevant authority. All procedures and the postoperative handling and care, including postoperative analgesics, should follow best practice.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/prd.12065 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Wiley
Host/Issue Periodontology 2000;1
Volume 68
ISSN 0906-6713
Pages 55-65
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/18775 (link to this page)

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