The charity organization and the thief: Understanding structures disabling public development in Sierra Leone

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The charity organization and the thief: Understanding structures disabling public development in Sierra Leone

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Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title The charity organization and the thief: Understanding structures disabling public development in Sierra Leone
Author(s) Persson, Maria
Date 2015
English abstract
Recent Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) reforms promoting Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) carried out by the Sierra Leonean government has attracted foreign investors into its extractive industry. Access to natural minerals in the country has been ensured through land leases, and the government of Sierra Leone has obtained the opportunity to accumulate revenues through participation on the global market. However, despite increasing state revenues the country remains underdeveloped and unindustrialized, and faces great challenges in promoting public development within state borders. This study aims at illuminating structures of the global economic system and domestic social fabric which may hinder public development in Sierra Leone. Such structures have be illuminated through the application of a qualitative approach including field work, participating observations and open-ended interviews in Kalansogoia chiefdom during May and June 2013. The findings of this study suggest that the international structure of dependency, and domestic formal; informal; informal institutions; and social networks structures hinder public development within Sierra Leone.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Kultur och samhälle
Pages 55 pages
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Dependency theory
Post-colonial theory
The economy of affection
FDI
Development
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/19434 (link to this page)

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