Mobile phone brief intervention applications for risky alcohol use among university students : Three randomized controlled studies

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Mobile phone brief intervention applications for risky alcohol use among university students : Three randomized controlled studies

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Title Mobile phone brief intervention applications for risky alcohol use among university students : Three randomized controlled studies
Author(s) Berman, Anne H ; Gajecki, Mikael ; Sinadinovic, Kristina ; Fredriksson, Morgan ; Lindviken, Charlie ; Andersson, Claes
Date 2015
English abstract
Introduction: Most university students overconsume alcohol and have smartphones. Brief online interventions reduce students’ alcohol intake. Delivering brief interventions to students via smartphone apps should be investigated. Method: Students at several Swedish universities were invited to the 3 studies described via e-mails and online ads. Students with a smartphone and risky alcohol consumption according to the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) were included, following informed consent. Three apps were tested, two targeting individual drinking choices on party occasions (Promillekoll and PartyPlanner), and one targeting high-risk users (TeleCoach™). Study 1 offered randomization into 3 groups: Promillekoll (1), offering real-time estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC) calculation; PartyPlanner (2), a web-based app with real-time eBAC calculation and additional planning/follow-up functions; a control group (3). Follow-up occurred at 7 weeks. Study 2 replicated Study 1; changes included improved apps based on Study 1 results, and follow-up times extended from 7 to 14 and 21 weeks (T1, T2 & T3). Study 3 offered participants at T1 from Study 2, who drank over 9 (women) and 14 (men) standard drinks/week, randomization into an intervention group (TeleCoach™) and a wait-list control group (intervention offered at T2). Results: For Study 1, 1932 fulfilled eligibility criteria for randomization. Attrition was 22.7–39.3 percent, higher among heavier drinkers and highest in Group 2. Per-protocol analyses revealed one significant timeby- group interaction, where Group 1 participants increased the frequency of their drinking occasions compared to controls (p = 0.001). Among all participants, 29 percent showed high-risk drinking, over the recommended weekly drinking levels of 9 (women) and 14 (men) standard glasses. Preliminary results will be reported for Studies 2 and 3. Discussion: Mobile phone apps offer a huge potential for making brief interventions available to more university students than ever before. Research is needed to identify effective app content.
Link http://static.sdu.dk/mediafiles//0/E/6/%7B0E6D9C2A-3347-46B7-BBF8-55551DBF73B8%7DFinal%20Book%20RH_22.05.15.pdf (external link to publication)
Publisher Unit of Clinical Alcohol Research at University of Southern Denmark
The University of New Mexico, CASAA
Host/Issue The 13th International Conference on Treatment of Addictive Behaviors, 31st of May-4th of June 2015, Odense, Denmark : Program and abstracts;
Pages 17
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Note The 13th International Conference on Treatment of Addictive Behaviors (ICTAB), Odense, Denmark
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/19695 (link to this page)
Link http://www.sdu.dk/en/Om_SDU/Institutter_centre/UCAR/ICTAB13 (external link to related web page)

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