Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions

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Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Interaction of polyelectrolytes with salivary pellicles on hydroxyapatite surfaces under erosive acidic conditions
Author(s) Delvar, Alice ; Lindh, Liselott ; Arnerant, Thomas ; Sotres, Javier
Date 2015
English abstract
The modification of acidic beverage formulations with food-approved, nonhazardous substances with antierosive properties has been identified as a key strategy for counteracting the prevalence of dental erosion, i.e., the acid-induced dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HA, the main mineral component of tooth surfaces). While many of such substances have been reported, very little is known on how they interact with teeth and inhibit their acid-induced dissolution. With the aim of filling this gap in knowledge, we have studied under acidic conditions the interaction between two polyelectrolytes of differing ionic character, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and chitosan, and saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, i.e., a model for the outer surface of teeth. These studies were performed by means of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and atomic force microscopy. We also studied, by means of pH variations, how dissolution of saliva-coated HA is affected by including these polyelectrolytes in the erosive solutions. Our results confirm that salivary films protect HA from acid-induced dissolution, but only for a limited time. If the acid is modified with CMC, this polyelectrolyte incorporates into the salivary films prolonging in time their protective function. Eventually, the CMC-modified salivary films are removed from the HA surfaces. From this moment, HA is continuously coated with CMC, but this offers only a weak protection against erosion. When the acid is modified with the cationic chitosan, the polyelectrolyte adsorbs on top of the salivary films. Chitosan-modified salivary films are also eventually replaced by bare chitosan films. In this case both coatings offer a similar protection against HA dissolution, which is nevertheless notably higher than that offered by CMC.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.5b07118 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher American Chemical Society
Host/Issue ACS applied materials & interfaces;7
Volume 38
ISSN 1944-8244
Pages 21610-21618
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) dental erosion
saliva
pellicle
hydroxyapatite
polyelectrolytes
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/19757 (link to this page)

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