Strains of Enterococcus faecalis differ in their ability to coexist in biofilms with other root canal bacteria

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Strains of Enterococcus faecalis differ in their ability to coexist in biofilms with other root canal bacteria

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Strains of Enterococcus faecalis differ in their ability to coexist in biofilms with other root canal bacteria
Author(s) Chávez de Paz, Luis ; Davies, Julia R ; Bergenholtz, Gunnar ; Svensäter, Gunnel
Date 2015
English abstract
AIM To investigate the relationship between protease production and the ability of Enterococcus faecalis strains to coexist in biofilms with other bacteria commonly recovered from infected root canals. METHODOLOGY: Biofilms with bacteria in mono-, dual- and four-species communities were developed in flow chambers. The organisms used were Lactobacillus salivarius, Streptococcus gordonii and Actinomyces naeslundii and E. faecalis strains, GUL1 and OG1RF. Biovolume and species distribution were examined using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with confocal microscopy and image analysis. The full proteome of the E. faecalis strains was studied using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Spots of interest were identified using tandem mass spectroscopy and quantified using Delta 2D software. RESULTS: All bacteria formed biofilms and an anova analysis revealed that the biofilm biomass increased significantly (P ≤ 0.01) between 6 and 24 h. L. salivarius, S. gordonii and A. naeslundii formed mutualistic biofilm communities, and this pattern was unchanged when E. faecalis GUL1 was included in the consortium. However, with OG1RF, L. salivarius and S. gordonii were outcompeted in a 24-h biofilm. Proteomic analysis revealed that OG1RF secreted higher levels of proteases, GelE (P = 0.02) and SprE (P = 0.002) and a previously unidentified serine protease (P = 0.05), than GUL1. CONCLUSIONS: Different strains of E. faecalis can interact synergistically or antagonistically with a consortium of root canal bacteria. A possible mechanism underlying this, as well as potential differences in virulence, is production of different levels of proteases, which can cause detachment of neighbouring bacteria and tissue damage.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iej.12501 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Wiley
Host/Issue International endodontic journal;10
Volume 48
ISSN 0143-2885
Pages 916-925
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) mixed species biofilm
oral cavity
oral bacteria
root canal
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/19824 (link to this page)

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