Self-ratings of everyday memory problems in patients with acquired brain injury : a tool for rehabilitation

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Self-ratings of everyday memory problems in patients with acquired brain injury : a tool for rehabilitation

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Self-ratings of everyday memory problems in patients with acquired brain injury : a tool for rehabilitation
Author(s) Tropp, Maria ; Persson, Cecilia ; Samuelsson, Kersti ; Lundqvist, Anna M ; Levander, Sten
Date 2015
English abstract
Introduction: Memory problems are common in everyday life of patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). Some patients with ABI also have problems with self-monitoring/awareness. The ecological validity of neuropsychological tests for everyday life memory problems is questionable. Can self-report instruments supply complementary information? Aims: 1) To document the frequency/impact of self-reported memory problems in a sample of consecutive referrals of ABI patients using PEEM and REEM. 2) To characterize the instruments with respect to psychometrics and internal consistency. 3) To document differences in memory problem patterns for various kinds/localization of brain lesions, and associated anxiety/ depression symptoms. Methods: A descriptive retrospective study of consecutive referrals of ABI patients was performed. Ratings from the Evaluation of Everyday Memory (EEM), in a patient version (PEEM) and a version for relatives/proxies (REEM) were analysed as well as self-ratings of anxiety and depression. Results: The EEM instruments displayed good psychometric characteristics. The mean PEEM score were close to the tenth percentile of healthy controls. PEEM and REEM versions were strongly inter-correlated. Sex, age, and lesion characteristics did not matter much with one exception. Right-hemisphere lesion patients rated their memory problems significantly lower than the proxy, for all other lesions it was vice versa. Anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with memory problems.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2329-9096.1000258 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher OMICS
Host/Issue International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation;2
Volume 3
ISSN 2329-9096
Pages 7
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Anxiety
Brain injury
Clinical relevance
daily life
depression
neuropsychology
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/19953 (link to this page)

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