Can the Subaltern Tweet? A Netnography of India’s Subaltern Voices Entering the Public via Social Media

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Can the Subaltern Tweet? A Netnography of India’s Subaltern Voices Entering the Public via Social Media

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Master Thesis
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Publication 1-year master student thesis
Title Can the Subaltern Tweet? A Netnography of India’s Subaltern Voices Entering the Public via Social Media
Author Kujat, Christopher Norman
Date 2016
English abstract
This netnography depicts the notions of India’s subaltern voices entering the public via social media. The study puts an emphasis on feminists and caste critics, divided into two case studies. The study witnessed dynamics of Twitter use between sociality and activism as well as the notions of performance and identity of these two intersecting, yet polarised groups. Privilege remains a governing factor, which regulates access, accessibility and the use of the subaltern sphere and makes it exclusive for a privileged group of the subaltern. The main benefits of Twitter in the subaltern sphere, as the study suggests, is the factor of sociality and networking around causes, which leads to peer dialogue in the public sphere and increases visibility. This eventually leads to more attention for certain causes in the public discourse and to the countering of mainstream media narratives, for example in the case study of the Dalit Lives Matter Movement and its ad hoc fame, which evolved after the suicide of the Dalit PhD scholar Rohith Vemula. Further, while online activism is present, its impact remains hard to measure. The main benefits of the space are the plurality of voices that inhabit it. Also, the unleashing of the counter­narratives towards the mainstream media that are even more controlled by the state than the new media landscape, is an important benefit.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Kultur och samhälle
Pages 77
Language eng (iso)
Subject India
Subaltern
Twitter
Netnography
Dalits
Feminism
Gender
Intersectionality
Voice
Tweet
Oppressed
ICT4D
Communication
Development
ComDev
C4D
Media
Internet
Web 2.0
Activism
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