Imagination laboratory : making sense of bio-objects in contemporary genetic art

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Imagination laboratory : making sense of bio-objects in contemporary genetic art

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Imagination laboratory : making sense of bio-objects in contemporary genetic art
Author(s) Holmberg, Tora ; Ideland, Malin
Date 2016
English abstract
Public engagement in biotechnology has declined as cloning, genetic engineering and regenerative medicine have become socially and culturally normalized. Zooming in on existing bio-technological debates, this article turns to contemporary genetic art as sites for ethical reflections. Art can be viewed as an ‘imagination laboratory’, a space through which un-framing and rupturing of contemporary rationalities are facilitated, and, in addition, enabling sense-making and offering fantastic connec- tions otherwise not articulated. In this article, the framework of ‘bio-objectification’ is enriched with Bennett’s (2001) notion of enchantment and the importance of wonder and openness to the unusual, in order to highlight alternative matters of concern than articulated through conventional politico-moral discourse. Drawing on a cultural sociological analysis of Eduardo Kac’s Edunia, Lucy Glendinning’s Feather Child, Patricia Piccinini’s Still Life with Stem Cells and Heather Dewey- Hagborg’s Stranger Visions, we discuss how the intermingling of art, science, critics, art historians, science fiction, internet, and physical space, produce a variety of at- tachments that this article will unpack. The article demonstrates that while some modern boundaries and rationalities are highlighted and challenged through the ‘imagination laboratory’ of the art process, others are left untouched.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-954X.12387 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Wiley
Host/Issue The Sociological Review;3
Volume 64
ISSN 1467-954X
Pages 447-467
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) bio-objectification
gene technology
ethics
enchantment
Jane Bennett
politico-moral discourse
Latour
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/21213 (link to this page)

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