Second premolar agenesis is associated with mandibular form: a geometric morphometric analysis of mandibular cross-sections

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Second premolar agenesis is associated with mandibular form: a geometric morphometric analysis of mandibular cross-sections

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Second premolar agenesis is associated with mandibular form: a geometric morphometric analysis of mandibular cross-sections
Author Bertl, Michael Hans ; Bertl, Kristina ; Wagner, Manuel ; Gahleitner, Andre ; Stavropoulos, Andreas ; Ulm, Christian ; Mitteröcker, Philipp
Date 2016
English abstract
The aim of this study was to compare mandibular form (i.e., size and shape) between patients with agenesis of the lower second premolar (P2) and a control group with no agenesis. Three hypotheses were tested: (H1) agenesis causes a change in mandibular morphology because of inadequate alveolar ridge development in the area of the missing tooth (mandibular plasticity); (H2) agenesis is caused by spatial limitations within the mandible (dental plasticity); and (H3) common genetic/ epigenetic factors cause agenesis and affect mandibular form (pleiotropy). A geometric morphometric analysis was applied to cross-sectional images of computed tomography (CT) scans of three matched groups (n = 50 each): (1) regularly erupted P2; (2) agenesis of P2 and the primary second molar in situ; and (3) agenesis of P2 and the primary second molar missing for 43 months. Cross-sections of the three areas of interest (first premolar, P2, first molar) were digitized with 23 landmarks and superimposed by a generalized Procrustes analysis. On average, the mandibular cross-sections were narrower and shorter in patients with P2 agenesis compared with that in the control group. Both agenesis groups featured a pronounced submandibular fossa. These differences extended at least one tooth beyond the agenesis-affected region. Taken together with the large interindividual variation that resulted in massively overlapping group distributions, these findings support genetic and/or epigenetic pleiotropy (H3) as the most likely origin of the observed covariation between mandibular form and odontogenesis. Clinically, reduced dimensions and greater variability of mandibular form, as well as a pronounced submandibular fossa, should be expected during the treatment planning of patients with P2 agenesis.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/ijos.2016.41 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijos.2016.41 .Icon
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Host/Issue International Journal of Oral Science;
Volume 8
ISSN 1674-2818
Pages 254–260
Language eng (iso)
Subject Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/21682 Permalink to this page
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