Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma

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Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma
Author Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta ; Lampa, E ; Marklund, S ; Wänman, A
Date 2016
English abstract
The relationship between whiplash trauma and chronic orofacial pain is unclear, especially with regard to the time elapsed from trauma to development of orofacial pain. The aim was to analyze prevalence of jaw pain and disability, as well as the relationship between pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions in the early nonchronic stage after whiplash trauma. In this case-control study, 70 individuals (40 women, 30 men, mean age 35.5 y) who visited an emergency department with neck pain following a car accident were examined within 3 wk of trauma (group 1) and compared with 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 33.8 y), who declined to attend a clinical examination but agreed to fill in questionnaires (group 2). The 2 case groups were compared with a matched control group of 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 37.6 y) without a history of neck trauma. All participants completed questionnaires regarding jaw pain and dysfunction, rating pain intensity in jaw and neck regions on the Numerical Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index, and Jaw Disability Checklist. Compared with controls, individuals with a recent whiplash trauma reported more jaw pain and dysfunction. Furthermore, there was a moderate positive correlation between jaw and neck pain ratings for group 1 (r = 0.61, P < 0.0001) and group 2 (r = 0.59, P < 0.0001). In the logistic regression analysis, cases showed higher odds ratios (range, 6.1 to 40.8) for jaw and neck pain and disability compared with controls. Taken together, the results show that individuals with a recent whiplash trauma report more jaw pain and disability compared with controls without a history of neck trauma. Furthermore, the correlation between jaw and neck pain intensity implies that intensity of neck pain in the acute stage after whiplash trauma might be a possible risk factor also for development of chronic orofacial pain.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034516653598 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Sage
Host/Issue Journal of Dental Research;10
Volume 95
ISSN 1544-0591
Pages 1155 -1160
Language eng (iso)
Subject myofascial pain
neurophysiology
neuroscience/neurobiology
orofacial pain/TMD
risk factor(s)
temporomandibular disorders/TMD
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22028 Permalink to this page
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