Collective efficacy and arson : The case of Malmö

DSpace Repository

Collective efficacy and arson : The case of Malmö

Details

Files for download
Author manuscript
Overview of item record
Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Collective efficacy and arson : The case of Malmö
Author Gerell, Manne
Date 2017
English abstract
The burning of cars and containers during social unrest has become a topic of both scholarly and public interest in Sweden over the past decade. Studies have suggested that social disorganization theory, or its modern expression collective efficacy, may be important for explaining why some neighbourhoods experience elevated levels of arson and unrest while others do not. To date, no study has explicitly studied the link between arson and collective efficacy at the neighbourhood level. The present study attempts to fill this gap by analysing the association between arson and collective efficacy in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Collective efficacy data from 96 neighbourhoods were collected in 2012 in the Malmö Community Survey (N = 4051). Arson data were collected from the rescue services, which employ GPS-receivers to accurately record the location of incidents. Regression models were fitted for arson, controlling for concentrated disadvantage, ethnic heterogeneity and residential stability. Results show no significant link between collective efficacy and arson following appropriate controls. This suggests that arson may depend on mechanisms other than collective efficacy, at least at the neighbourhood level. Future research may need to focus on alternative theoretical explanations such as strain, or on other levels of analysis than neighbourhoods.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/14043858.2017.1298172 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Routledge
Host/Issue Journal of Scandinavian studies in criminology and crime prevention;
ISSN 1404-3858
Pages 1-17
Language eng (iso)
Subject collective efficacy
arson
social disorganization
riots
fire-setting
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22447 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics