Skills Training via Smartphone App for University Students with Excessive Alcohol Consumption : a Randomized Controlled Trial

DSpace Repository

Skills Training via Smartphone App for University Students with Excessive Alcohol Consumption : a Randomized Controlled Trial

Details

Files for download Overview of item record
Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Skills Training via Smartphone App for University Students with Excessive Alcohol Consumption : a Randomized Controlled Trial
Author Gajecki, Mikael ; Andersson, Claes ; Rosendahl, Ingvar ; Sinadinovic, Kristina ; Fredriksson, Morgan ; Berman, Anne H
Date 2017
English abstract
PURPOSE: University students in a study on estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC) feedback apps were offered participation in a second study, if reporting continued excessive consumption at 6-week follow-up. This study evaluated the effects on excessive alcohol consumption of offering access to an additional skills training app. METHOD: A total of 186 students with excessive alcohol consumption were randomized to an intervention group or a wait list group. Both groups completed online follow-ups regarding alcohol consumption after 6 and 12 weeks. Wait list participants were given access to the intervention at 6-week follow-up. Assessment-only controls (n = 144) with excessive alcohol consumption from the ongoing study were used for comparison. RESULTS: The proportion of participants with excessive alcohol consumption declined in both intervention and wait list groups compared to controls at first (p < 0.001) and second follow-ups (p = 0.054). Secondary analyses showed reductions for the intervention group in quantity of drinking at first follow-up (-4.76, 95% CI [-6.67, -2.85], Z = -2.09, p = 0.037) and in frequency of drinking at both follow-ups (-0.83, 95% CI [-1.14, -0.52], Z = -2.04, p = 0.041; -0.89, 95% CI [-1.16, -0.62], Z = -2.12, p = 0.034). The odds ratio for not having excessive alcohol consumption among men in the intervention group compared to male controls was 2.68, 95% CI [1.37, 5.25] (Z = 2.88, p = 0.004); the figure for women was 1.71, 95% CI [1.11, 2.64] (Z = 2.41, p = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Skills training apps have potential for reducing excessive alcohol use among university students. Future research is still needed to disentangle effects of app use from emailed feedback on excessive alcohol consumption and study participation. TRIAL REGISTRATION:NCT02064998.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s12529-016-9629-9 (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Link http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12529-016-9629-9 .Icon
Publisher Springer
Host/Issue International Journal of Behavioral Medicine;
ISSN 1070-5503
Language eng (iso)
Subject Alcohol abuse
Brief intervention
College
Mobile phone
Problem drinking
Randomized controlled trial
Relapse prevention
Smartphone
University
eHealth
mHealth
Humanities/Social Sciences
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22575 Permalink to this page
Facebook

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Details

Search


Browse

My Account

Statistics