Gender differences in cyberbullying victimization among adolescents in Europe. A systematic review.

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Gender differences in cyberbullying victimization among adolescents in Europe. A systematic review.

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Publication 2-year master student thesis
Title Gender differences in cyberbullying victimization among adolescents in Europe. A systematic review.
Author Gustafsson, Elin
Date 2017
English abstract
Digital technologies has become the leading way for individuals to communicate, but despite its many advances it may also be misused for harmful behaviors. Over the last decade cyberbullying has become a serious social health problem worldwide. It has been estimated that roughly 20 to 40% of all adolescents will experience at least one act of cyberbullying. Even though an extensive amount of research has been carried out some uncertainties remains, for instance whether there are any gender differences in experiences. The overarching aim with the current review was to analyze the role of gender in cyberbullying victimization among European adolescents. The specific aspects explored were gender differences in victimization and misused technological platforms. In order to achieve the aim a systematic review of recent evidence was carried out. Based on established inclusion criteria searches for both published and non-published articles were made in the databases of EBSCOhost, ProQuest and other sources. The selection process identified seven eligible studies that were included for analysis. The prevalence rate of cyberbullying victimization was ranging from 5% to 28%, with one study reporting higher frequencies. The findings implied a slightly higher likelihood among girls. However, the technological platforms used for victimization were similar for both boys and girls, some of the more frequently misused platforms were social networking sites, instant messaging and text messages. The review findings suggest prevention strategies are directed toward the most popular technological environments, with a somewhat stronger emphasis on girls.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Hälsa och samhälle
Pages 66
Language eng (iso)
Subject adolescence
cyberbullying
Europe
gender
information & communication technologies (ICT)
victimization
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/22790 Permalink to this page
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