Smoking Cessation After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Relation to Depression and Personality Factors

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Smoking Cessation After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Relation to Depression and Personality Factors

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title Smoking Cessation After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Relation to Depression and Personality Factors
Author Schlyter, Mona ; Leosdottir, Margrét ; Engström, Gunnar ; André-Petersson, Lena ; Tydén, Patrik ; Östman, Margareta
Date 2016
English abstract
Smoking is an important cardiovascular risk factor and smoking cessation should be a primary target in secondary prevention after a myocardial infarction (MI). The purpose of this study was to examine whether personality, coping and depression were related to smoking cessation after an MI MI patients a parts per thousand currency sign 70 years (n = 323, 73 % men, 58.7 +/- 8.3 years), participating in the Secondary Prevention and Compliance following Acute Myocardial Infarction study in Malmö, Sweden, between 2002 and 2005, were interviewed by a psychologist to assess coping strategies and completed Beck Depression and NEO Personality Inventories, in close proximity to the acute event. Correlation between smoking status (current, former and never), personality factors, coping and depression was assessed at baseline and 24 months after the MI using logistic regression and in a multivariate analysis, adjusting for age and sex Of the participating patients, 46 % were current smokers. Two years after the event, 44 % of these were still smoking. At baseline, current smokers scored higher on the depression and neuroticism scales and had lower agreeableness scores. Patients who continued to smoke after 2 years had higher scores on being confrontational (i.e. confrontative coping style) compared to those who had managed to quit. Patients who continued to smoke had significantly lower agreeableness and were more often living alone Personality, coping strategies and psychosocial circumstances are associated with smoking cessation rates in patients with MI. Considering personality factors and coping strategies to better individualise smoking cessation programs in MI patients might be of importance.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s12529-015-9514-y (link to publisher's fulltext.)
Publisher Springer
Host/Issue International Journal of Behavioral Medicine;2
Volume 23
ISSN 1070-5503
Pages 234-242
Language eng (iso)
Subject Personality factor
Depression
Smoking cessation
Acute myocardial infarction
Prevention
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/23051 Permalink to this page
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