Oral disease and psychosocial risk determinants in relation to self-assessments of general health in persons with chronic whiplash-related disorders.

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Oral disease and psychosocial risk determinants in relation to self-assessments of general health in persons with chronic whiplash-related disorders.

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Publication Article, other scientific
Title Oral disease and psychosocial risk determinants in relation to self-assessments of general health in persons with chronic whiplash-related disorders.
Author(s) Axtelius, Björn ; Söderfeldt, Björn
Date 2003
English abstract
The aim of this study was to analyse how self-assessed general health was related to oral health among persons afflicted with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), controlling for relevant background factors, confounders and other risk factors. Questionnaires included the SF-36 Health Survey, self-assessed oral health and relevant risk factors, in total 49 questions. Multivariable regression modelling was performed. Members of a nationwide Swedish association enlisting persons who have problems concerning a whiplash injury (n = 1,928) were included. A total of 979 persons participated in the study, a response rate of 50.8%. A multivariable regression model is presented, with general health as the dependent variable, and the independent variables inserted en-bloc. The model was highly significant with an explained variance of 28%. Among background factors, only older age appeared as significantly and strongly related to poorer general health. The strongest explanatory contributions came from the health related variables. Oral disease and extra-oral body pain were both strongly related to poorer general health, most obviously for the oral disease variable. Oral disease was significantly and to a clinically relevant degree associated with self-assessed general health. Several other psychosocial indicators of stress were also significantly related to the general health. These findings are consistent with the stress-behaviour-immune model for development of disease.
Host/Issue Swedish dental journal
ISSN 0347-9994
Pages 27: 185-195
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/3031 (link to this page)

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