Computer-Mediated Instructional Video: A Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing A Sequential And A Segmented Instructional Video In Surgical Hand Wash

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Computer-Mediated Instructional Video: A Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing A Sequential And A Segmented Instructional Video In Surgical Hand Wash

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Publication Article, other scientific
Title Computer-Mediated Instructional Video: A Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing A Sequential And A Segmented Instructional Video In Surgical Hand Wash
Author(s) Schittek Janda, Martin ; Tani Botticelli, Antonella ; Mattheos, Nikos ; Nebel, Daniel ; Wagner, Anders ; Nattestad, Anders ; Attström, Rolf
Date 2005
English abstract
BACKGROUND: Video-based instructions for clinical procedures have been used frequently during the preceding decades. AIM: To investigate in a randomised controlled trial the learning effectiveness of fragmented videos vs. the complete sequential video and to analyse the attitudes of the user towards video as a learning aid. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An instructional video on surgical hand wash was produced. The video was available in two different forms in two separate web pages: one as a sequential video and one fragmented into eight short clips. Twenty-eight dental students in the second semester were randomised into an experimental (n = 15) and a control group (n = 13). The experimental group used the fragmented form of the video and the control group watched the complete one. The use of the videos was logged and the students were video taped whilst undertaking a test hand wash. The videos were analysed systematically and blindly by two independent clinicians. The students also performed a written test concerning learning outcome from the videos as well as they answered an attitude questionnaire. RESULTS: The students in the experimental group watched the video significantly longer than the control group. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to the ratings and scores when performing the hand wash. The experimental group had significantly better results in the written test compared with those of the control group. There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to attitudes towards the use of video for learning, as measured by the Visual Analogue Scales. Most students in both groups expressed satisfaction with the use of video for learning. CONCLUSION: The students demonstrated positive attitudes and acceptable learning outcome from viewing CAL videos as a part of their pre-clinical training. Videos that are part of computer-based learning settings would ideally be presented to the students both as a segmented and as a whole video to give the students the option to choose the form of video which suits the individual student's learning style.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0579.2004.00366.x (link to publisher's fulltext)
Host/Issue Eururopean journal of dental education;2
Volume 9
ISSN 1396-5883
Pages 53-8
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Medicine
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/3096 (link to this page)

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