An in vitro study of initial adsorption from human parotid and submandibular/sublingual resting saliva at solid/liquid interfaces

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An in vitro study of initial adsorption from human parotid and submandibular/sublingual resting saliva at solid/liquid interfaces

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Publication Article, peer reviewed scientific
Title An in vitro study of initial adsorption from human parotid and submandibular/sublingual resting saliva at solid/liquid interfaces
Author(s) Lindh, Liselott ; Glantz, Per-Olof ; Isberg, Per-Erik ; Arnebrant, Thomas
Date 2001
English abstract
The influence of saliva concentration, saliva total protein content and the wetting characteristics of exposed solids on in vitro film formation was studied by the technique of in situ ellipsometry. The rates and plateau values of adsorption (45 min) at solid/liquid interfaces (hydrophilic silica and hydrophobic methylated silica surfaces) were determinated for human parotid (HPS) and submandibular/sublingual (HSMSLS) resting saliva solutions (0.1 and 1.0%, (v/v), saliva in phosphate buffered saline). Adsorption rates were related to a model assuming mass transport through an unstirred layer adjacent to the surface. The results showed that the adsorption was rapid, concentration dependent and higher on hydrophobic than on hydrophilic surfaces. Analysis of the influence of protein concentration on the adsorbed amounts demonstrated an interaction between protein concentration and the two surfaces for HPS and HSMSLS, respectively. This may indicate differences in binding mode. Inter-individual differences were found not to be significant at the 1% level of probability. Comparison of the observed adsorption and calculated diffusion rates suggest that on hydrophilic surfaces initial adsorption of proteins diffusing at rates corresponding to those of statherin and aPRPs takes place, whereas on hydrophobic surfaces lower molecular mass compounds appear to be involved.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08927010109378482 (link to publisher's fulltext)
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Host/Issue Biofouling;3
Volume 17
ISSN 0892-7014
Pages 227-239
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) Saliva
Ellipsometry
Protein
Liquid solid interface
adsorption
Salivary gland
Human
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::ODONTOLOGY
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/4066 (link to this page)

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