‘Marks’ or ‘grades’? – an investigation concerning attitudes towards British English and American English among students and teachers in three Swedish upper-secondary schools

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‘Marks’ or ‘grades’? – an investigation concerning attitudes towards British English and American English among students and teachers in three Swedish upper-secondary schools

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Publication Student thesis
Title ‘Marks’ or ‘grades’? – an investigation concerning attitudes towards British English and American English among students and teachers in three Swedish upper-secondary schools
Author(s) Sjöstedt, Jimmy ; Vranic, Monika
Date 2007
English abstract
English is today a vast world language, and the foremost important business and cross-border language in the world. The two predominant English varieties in the Swedish educational system are British English and American English. A third variety, Mid-Atlantic English, is however on the up-rise, and many researchers expect this to be the future educational standard variety due to escalating globalization. British English is the variety which traditionally has been taught in the Swedish school, but the last couple of decades American English have been gaining ground because of popular media. Today both varieties are referred to in the Swedish National Curriculum, and teachers as well as students face a multifaceted choice. The aim of this paper is to investigate attitudes among upper-secondary level teachers and students; on what grounds they have chosen their personal variety and to what extent they are aware of what English variety they use. What we have seen is that resolute attitudes can be perceived towards the two Englishes. Furthermore, our investigation shows that students mix British and American English, and even though British English still is held in academic esteem, American English characteristics predominate in the mix. British English is recurrently described as “snobbish” and in a more positive fashion as “high-class”, whereas American English is perceived either as “youthful and cool” or “dim and uneducated”. Even students who prefer and think they use British English, to a large extent use American orthography and spelling.
Publisher Malmö högskola/Lärarutbildningen
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) British English
BrE
American English
AmE
Attitudes
Upper-secondary school
English as a foreign language
EFL
English as a second language
ESL
Mid-Atlantic English
MAE
Euroenglish
Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/4270 (link to this page)

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