Endocytosis by human dendritic cells

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Endocytosis by human dendritic cells

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Publication Doctoral Thesis
Title Endocytosis by human dendritic cells
Author(s) Andersson, Linda
Date 2009
English abstract
Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells with the ability to internalize antigen, and present antigen-derived peptides to T cells. The functions of DCs depend on the subset, as well as their location and activation state. Immature DCs act as sentinels by continuously sampling the antigenic environment through various endocytosing mechanisms. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the use of dealuminated zeolites as a delivery tool to study the early events during endocytosis, including recognition and uptake, in human DCs. In the first study, we showed that dealuminated zeoilte particles can be used to follow endosomal acidification and proteolysis in human peripheral blood DCs. In the following studies we further investigated zeolite particles, and showed that they have a unique capacity to adsorb various biomolecules, proteins as well as differently charged lipids. This feature makes zeolites an ideal tool to study receptor-mediated endocytosis. Using zeolites coated with different ligands, we could show major differences in the endocytic capacity in human blood plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and myeloid DCs (mDCs). The pDCs showed an almost complete lack of endocytosis whereas the mDCs had an efficient selective receptor-mediated endocytosis of IgG-, LTA-, and LPS-coated zeolite particles. Furthermore, capture was strongly dependent upon the density of the ligands adsorbed onto the zeolite particles. In the last study, we used zeolites to compare endocytosing capacity in mDC and MoDC (monocyte-derived DC). We could show that these cell populations differ considerably in their ability to capture particles, immune complexes and soluble molecules. Therefore, in vitro generated MoDCs does not seem to be an applicable model for peripheral blood mDCs when studying the early events of endocytosis. In conclusion, zeolite particles provide a valuable tool to gain more understanding of the endocytosing mechanisms not only in DCs but also in other endocytosing cell populations.
Publisher Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society
Series/Issue Malmö University Health and Society Doctoral Dissertations;1
ISSN 1653-5383
ISBN 978-91-7104-222-4
Pages 65
Language eng (iso)
Subject(s) human dendritic cells
endocytosis
Medicine
Research Subject Categories::MEDICINE
Research Subject Categories::NATURAL SCIENCES
Included papers
  1. Linda Andersson and Håkan Eriksson, Dealuminated zeolite Y as a tool to study endocytosis, a delivery system revealing differences between human peripheral dendritic cells. Scand. J Immun. 2007;66:52-61.

  2. Linda Andersson, Peter Hellman and Håkan Eriksson, Receptor-mediated endocytosis of particles by peripheral dendritic cells, Human Immunology 2008;69:625-633.

  3. Peter Hellman, Linda Andersson and Håkan Eriksson, Ligand surface density is important for efficient capture of immunoglobulin and phosphatidylcholine coated particles by human peripheral dendritic cells, Cellular Immunology 2009; 258:123-130

  4. Linda Andersson, Peter Hellman and Håkan Eriksson, Myeloid blood dendritic cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells differ in their ability to perform the early events of the endocytosing mechanism, Manuscript

  5. Andersson, L. I. M. and Eriksson, H. (2007), De-aluminated Zeolite Y as a Tool to Study Endocytosis, A Delivery System Revealing Differences between Human Peripheral Dendritic Cells. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 66: 52–61. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3083.2007.01948.x

  6. Andersson, L. I. M., Hellman, P., & Eriksson, H. (2008). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of particles by peripheral dendritic cells. Human Immunology, 69(10), 625-633

  7. Hellman, P., Andersson, L., & Eriksson, H. (2009). Ligand surface density is important for efficient capture of immunoglobulin and phosphatidylcholine coated particles by human peripheral dendritic cells. Cellular Immunology, 258(2), 123-130

Handle http://hdl.handle.net/2043/9052 (link to this page)
Buy print http://webshop.holmbergs.com...9052 (print-on-demand service)

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